This Brooklyn NYPD District Is the Bloodiest in New York City

It was once known as New York’s “Killing Ground” — and amid a wave of Big Apple crime, Brooklyn’s 75th Precinct has once again made the dubious distinction of being the city’s bloodiest.

The 5.5-mile area, which spans eastern New York and Cypress Hills, has recorded the most shootings so far this year — with 48 shootings resulting in 56 casualties, according to NYPD records.

The 75th is the scene of so many gun battles that even experienced officers can’t tell which part is the most dangerous.

“Asking for the worst block in the 75th is like asking for the best pizza in New York — you have too many to choose from,” said an NYPD source.

The district was the rotten core of the Big Apple in the late 1980s and early 1990s, with a front-page story in The Post calling it the city’s “KILLING GROUND” in May 1993, when every 63 hours a murder occurred.

And bullets are flying over the 75th again this year, with shooting incidents up 26.3% through Sunday, compared to the same period last year.

In an even more ominous sign since the onset of the summer heat, admissions have doubled in the past 28 days — a 100% increase — compared to 2021.

map of the 75th district
1. November 3, 2021 at 4:15 a.m.: An NYPD officer fired at a car theft suspect who rammed into a patrol car at the intersection of Jamaica Avenue and Wyona Street. 2. March 23, 2022, at 1:30 p.m.: A man was stabbed on the platform of the Van Siclen Avenue J&Z Line subway station at the corner of Van Siclen Avenue and Fulton Street in Cypress Hills. 3. July 1, 2022, at 10:06 PM: Two men were shot and killed in a bodega on the corner of Stanley Avenue and Crescent Street in East New York. 4. July 4, 2022, at 11:35 PM: Two men were killed in a shootout at a deli at 1372 Loring St. in East New York. 5. July 17, 2022, at 6:30 p.m.: An elderly woman was shot while sitting on a bench in a courtyard at the Pink Houses public housing project in eastern New York. 6. June 11, 2022, at 11:30 p.m.: Three people, including two teenagers, were shot when gunmen crashed into a backyard party at 264 Essex St. and opened fire in Cypress Hills.

Residents are outraged at the massacre – blaming soft-on-crime pulse.

“It’s what the people wanted,” said a Bodega Tree Food Market worker who gave his name to Abraham.

“They wanted to punish the police, so now there is no police around. What do you expect?”

The violence targeted both criminals with weapons and innocent bystanders.

A recent victim of a stray bullet fired in the neighborhood was Georgette Outlaw, 74, who was hit in the abdomen around 6:30 p.m. on July 17 as she sat quietly on a bench outside her home in the Pink Houses public housing complex.

Police are outside a scene.
The 75th Precinct has reported 48 shootings that left 56 casualties.
HG

Outlaw will remain in the hospital, her daughter said from behind their apartment door on Wednesday, adding only, “She’s doing fine.”

No one has been arrested yet.

Canarsie resident Dyran Sloan, who regularly stops by the Pink Houses to visit his mother-in-law, said he regularly played the card game ‘spades’ with Outlaw, who is known as ‘Joyce’.

“She’s not a troublemaker,” said Sloan, 62.

“She is an older person and walks with a walker.”

Sloan complained that criminals “have more powerful weapons out here” than the NYPD, adding, “They don’t carry f–king .22s anymore. They carry M-16s.”

Sloan said the situation made him plan to move to Virginia.

“The people here are sick. I’m tired of New York,” he said. “It’s become a battlefield now.”

Police respond to a shooting in Brooklyn.
Brooklyn’s 75th Precinct is the bloodiest in New York City this year.
Paul Martinka

At the Tree Food Market — near where a 36-year-old man survived when he was shot in the neck and abdomen on March 13 — Abraham said everyone was so aware of the danger that some encouraged him to arm himself.

“I have people, random people from the street who come in and offer me weapons,” he said.

“They say, ‘For your protection.'”

A 74-year-old woman who lives in the area repeated Abraham’s call for more police.

“We need more foot patrols,” she said.

“I don’t believe in this ban on the police,” said the woman, who called her name Cheryl.

“That’s a lot of nonsense, because we need the police. We need them.”

The Post once referred to the area of ​​the city as
The Post once referred to the area of ​​the city as “Killing Ground.”

There have been shootings at local bodegas, including a wild gunfight that killed two men, ages 21 and 23, and wounded an 18-year-old man at the Raspberry Deli on Loring St. 1372, at around 11:35 p.m. on 4 July.

Police found three guns amid the massacre and arrested Malachi Kirkland, 19, who is charged with murder and related crimes.

An eerie scene also played out at the bodega at 899 Crescent St., where Travon Jones, 36, walked in and shot Dennis Simon, 37, in the chest around 10 p.m. on July 1.

Jones then began strangling Simon, who managed to grab Jones’ gun and kill him in what authorities considered a case of self-defense.

“It’s really bad,” said a man who lives across the street and called his name “Yum Yum.”

“There are too many shootings in a row. Too many young people are dying.”

Police respond to a shooting at a bodega on the corner of Stanley Avenue and Crescent Street in Brooklyn.
On July 1, two men were killed at a bodega on Crescent Street.
Seth Gottfried

Despite its infamous reputation, last year the 75th district was eclipsed in total by the adjacent 73rd district, which brought in 79 admissions, compared to 71 in the 75th.

This year’s 73rd is number 2, with 40 admissions, followed by the 44th district in The Bronx, with 36.

The official count doesn’t tell the whole story, though, because the NYPD’s CompStat numbers don’t count occasions when bullets don’t hit casualties.

One such incident in the 75th District occurred during a walking gunfight that took place in broad daylight on Feb. 26 near 475 Riverdale Ave.

Surveillance video on NYPD Crime Stoppers Twitter page shows two men firing multiple rounds to each other as one chases the other across the street and block at about 9:50 AM

A backyard party at 264 Essex St. 264 was the scene of multiple shootings on June 11 when gunmen showed up and opened fire around 11:30 p.m.

A 15-year-old boy was shot in the left leg and another man was shot in the right arm, as was a 16-year-old boy who was nearby on the corner of Essex Street and Atlantic Avenue.

Police said two of the victims had criminal records and an unidentified 16-year-old boy was arrested in the shooting.

On Feb. 9, officers found Modassar Khandakar, 36, fatally shot in the face outside his Forbell Street home at around 12:49 PM.

Modassar Khandakar was lying on the ground next to his 2009 Honda CRV, the door of which was open, according to police and police sources.
Modassar Khandakar was lying on the ground next to his 2009 Honda CRV, the door of which was open, according to police and police sources.
Seth Gottfried

Khandakar was lying next to his 2009 Honda CRV, the door of which was open, and a single 9mm casing was found on the sidewalk nearby, but the murder remains unsolved.

Nurse Mizy Rahman, 20, said he has lived his entire life in the area, which is home to a large Bangladeshi population and most homes have security gates covering the doors and windows.

“It’s definitely worse than before,” Rahman said.

Rahman noted that there were “much worse” areas nearby and said he didn’t go out after dark.

“It’s very, very dangerous at night,” Rahman said.

A boy is taken to the ambulance on a stretcher.
A 15-year-old boy was shot in the left leg and another man was shot in the right arm, as was a 16-year-old boy who was nearby on the corner of Essex Street and Atlantic Avenue on June 11.
Paul Martinka

“The ones that actually shoot don’t catch them.”

At the Redwood Senior Living complex, a 70-year-old man told a similar story, saying, “You can hardly walk at night anymore.”

“There’s no respect for the law in this town anymore,” he said angrily.

“We’ll just stay here and enter the apartment.”

The man, who declined to give his name, added: “You don’t know who you will find on the street.”

“They can rob you for free, and they won’t just rob you, they’ll kill you, so it’s better to be home,” he said.

“People used to live with the windows open. Now that is not possible.”

Additional reporting by Tina Moore and Joe Marino

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